I found a neat article over at the New York Times Archives entitled “Ideas % Trends; Scalia Speaks Up, Quite Clearly, At Bar Convention from 1987. According to the article, Justice Scalia was the most talkative person on the bench even in the late 80′s when he was a relative newcomer to the Court.

The New York Times archive is a great resource for information about our recent history. In my brief search, I found a few articles from 1957 about the Dred Scott decision here, here, and here. As far as I can tell from the articles, the Dred Scott case was followed more closely by the general public than any case in recent memory. There were 3-4 front page articles in the New York Times outlining just the arguments that were made during oral arguments. Today, even the hottest Supreme Court cases would only get one front page article.


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