Archive for September, 2007

Today is the 6-month anniversary of the DailyWrit. Accordingly, if the DailyWrit were an infant, it would have just started babbling, expecting baths, and enjoying a good cuddle. It seems like just a few days ago I was rambling about a Supreme Court-related blog post to a friend when he, presumably tired of listening to [...]

A Look At Deluge

The massive downpour of cases on Tuesday has placed the docket five cases ahead of last year. The problem, however, is that the Court despite placing many of the cases on expedited review for the January session, the December session still has only seven cases available. If the Court hears only seven cases in December, [...]

The Court today granted review in a staggering 17 cases! Just a few days ago I had anticipated 8-12 cases but apparently the Justices had other ideas in mind. In the next hour I’ll be posting serious information on each of the cases as well as updating the OT2007 Case Index. 06-937 QUANTA COMPUTER, INC., [...]

From now until the start of October Term 2007 on October 1, I’ll be counting down the things that I’m looking forward to in the upcoming term of the Court. Today I’ll take a look at the Court’s power struggle with its co-equal branches. Supreme Court Justices have always been considered a body of intellectuals [...]

There is a common consensus among students of the Court that the 2006 Term was one of the most controversial and breathtaking in recent memory. Not since Bush v. Gore have Supreme Court Justices disagreed with each other so sharply. At this point last year (one week before the term begins), the Court had already [...]

Robert Post and Reva Siegel have a rather interesting, albeit inconclusive article about liberal constitutionalism over at The New Republic. I’ve written at great length about the issue (here and here) and my own democratic game-plan lines up closely alongside theirs. They note that the recent rise of originalism can be attributed to the parallel [...]

Judges Have Lives Too

The folks over at the Sentencing Law and Policy blog (creatively named after a textbook published with the same name and written by the same authors) have broken the news of Federal District Judge Paul Cassell’s retirement. Ordinarily this wouldn’t be a major issue, but the WSJ law blog highlights the most important part of [...]

Zap

Kid gets tasered in Florida at a Kerry speech because he talked over his time and resisted police. I’m just going to presume you’ve already heard the story. But what is up with the public outcry over this tasering? Everywhere I look, news agencies are pumping out stories about how this is an egregious violation [...]

Hook ‘Em

Yesterday the University of Texas sent out an email to all of its students outlining its policy towards hazing and detailing some crimes that are considered hazing. You can find the entire email in memorandum form here but these are the relevant excerpts: According to the law, a person can commit a hazing offense not [...]

Those crazy Louisianians are at it again! Apparently, a US District Court Judge has upheld the placement of a picture of Jesus in a Louisianian courthouse. The picture is placed within the broader context of a display featuring prominent lawmakers in history including Mohammed (with Koran), Charlemagne, Napoleon, and King Louis IX. The decision in [...]



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